Ranking: The eight countries with the largest volumes of fresh water

 Rosenberg A. Ranking: The eight countries with the largest volumes of fresh water

Andres Rosenberg

The ranking of countries with the largest volume of fresh water is represented by Brazil, Canada, Indonesia, China, India, United States, Colombia and Peru. About 1,100 million people, more than one-sixth of the world’s population lack access to drinking water, and even in places where apparently there is enough water, the poor have limited access to it. Brazil and Canada are the world’s richest countries in water reserves, with 13% and 9% of available fresh water on the planet respectively.

Some 1,100 million people more than one sixth of the world’s population lack access to drinking water, and even in places where apparently there is enough water, the poor have limited access to it, has denounced the Council for Access to Water and Health Resources (WSSCC). In Europe, water scarcity is critical in Spain, southern Italy, Greece and the Balkans, parts of the Netherlands, Germany, the Netherlands and England.
The ranking of countries with the largest volume of fresh water, does not necessarily mean a good supply of it in the form of drinking water, as can be seen in many countries. The volume flow measurement is expressed in cubic meters per second.

Source: World Bank & Trading Economics

1. – Brazil. Brazil is the world’s richest country in water reserves, with more than 13% of available fresh water on the planet. Nevertheless, according to a report released on the occasion of the World Water Forum in Mexico, 57 million of the 190 million lack safe drinking water.

2. – Canada. Canada owns 9% of renewable freshwater in the world, most of it is underground and it is estimated that its volume is 37 times larger than the water of lakes and rivers. It is known that groundwater supplies by 22% to Lake Erie and 42% of the lakes Huron and Ontario. More than a quarter of Canadians groundwater supply for domestic use. Despite having so much water, the population reached only 40% of it.

3. – Indonesia. Despite the tsunami that hit Indonesia in 2004, the country remains one of the largest fresh water reserves in the world, but again the problem lies in providing the same.

4. – China. In China there are a lot of water, but there are even more people. China produces more than 3.5 million tons of wastewater per day. To provide treatment to half that amount, they would need to invest in 10,000 treatment facilities. There are some modern plants waste water treatment and sanitation systems. Perhaps half of China’s population, some 600 million people consume water that is contaminated with human or animal waste. These people are subject to waterborne diseases and a myriad of health problems associated with the use of contaminated water.

5. – United States. Water consumption in the U.S. is the highest in the world and water rates are the lowest in the developed world. The 83% of households are served by sewerage (95% in urban areas and 33% in rural areas) and the rest is supplied by sanitation on the site.

6. – Colombia. Access to water and sanitation in Colombia and the quality of these services has increased significantly over the last decade. It drinking water coverage reaches 93% of the population. However, significant challenges remain, including insufficient coverage of services, especially in rural and poor quality of water and sanitation services. Compared to some other countries in Latin America, the sector is characterized by high levels of investment and cost recovery, the existence of some large public companies efficient and strong and stable local private sector participation.

7. – Peru. In urban areas the average continuous water service was 18 hours a day in 2007. Only two service providers in Peru had continued service in 2007. This means an improvement compared to 1997 when the average was 13 continuous hours. In rural areas the average was 18 hours and in urban areas 12 hours. In the regions of the coast was 8 hours, jungle and saw 18 hours and 10 hours Metropolitan Lima. In 2007 in Metropolitan Lima the service was 21 hours a day.

8. – India. In addition to the long periods of drought and low average rainfall, in the  most parts of India monsoon seasons occur, which typically occur between June and September. Collection programs attempt to capture rainwater that monsoon rainfall and make it last all year. But the same thing happens in China due to the high number of people, no supplies for the entire population. In fact, according to UNICEF, 38% of children born in India are malnourished, one of the main reasons is the consume contaminated water for those who do not have access to drinking water.

Although Chile is not among the countries with the largest fresh water reserves in the world, it is one of the only planet that has a 100% coverage of drinking water for its inhabitants.

http://www.plataformaurbana.cl/archive/2010/09/09/ranking-los-ocho-paises-con-los-mayores-volumenes-de-agua-potable/

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