Global Sea Levels Increased by 3mm a Year Since 1990

Global Sea Levels increased by 3 mm a year since 1990.

By Climate News Network in Flood Protection, January 26, 2015

There are several reports based on scientific studies regarding sea level rises. Studies show sea level rise along US coastal regions has accelerated from 1.7mm a year in the last century to 3.2mm a year in the last 20 years. Flooding during high tides is now common in some places, as consequence of global warming the news comes from Marshall Islands are seeing severe floods after a king tide where the prospect of further sea level rises poses threatens the existence of a country just about 2 metres above sea level.

Over the last few months there have been several reports based on scientific studies regarding sea level rises, especially in the USA. Earlier this year, researchers from NOAA said that their studies show sea level rise along US coastal regions has accelerated from 1.7mm a year in the last century to 3.2mm a year in the last 20 years. Flooding events that were once extreme will soon be the norm, with many coastal cities facing “nuisance flooding” up to 30 times per year.

In October 2014, a report the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) said that flooding during high tides is now common in some places in USA and is projected to grow to the point that sections of coastal cities may flood so often they would become unusable in the near future.

Below is a report by Tim Radford of Climate News Network about recent research from Harvard University which found that there has been an almost threefold annual increase in global sea levels over the last quarter of a century. This news comes at a time when the Marshall Islands in Oceania are seeing severe floods after a king tide where the prospect of further sea level rises poses threatens the existence of a country just 7 feet , about 2 metres above sea level.

http://floodlist.com/protection/global-sea-levels-increased-3mm-a-year-since-1990

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