How the kingdom of Kerma survived drought

How the kingdom of Kerma survived drought that devastated Egypt and Mesopotamia

Anastasia Gubin – The Epoch Times

Archaeologists reveal how the kingdom of Kerma, also known as Nubia flourished in northern Sudan and survived the catastrophic drought that devastated large with the famous dynasties of the time in Egypt and Mesopotamia, 4200 years ago. Three Nile river channels are dry today, gave life to this famous reign on the border with Egypt. This civilization was truly remarkable, producing some of the finest ceramics in the valley of the Nile.

The study shows that between the years 2500 b. C. and 1,500 b. C, Kerma flourished thanks to the beds of the Nile canals, which proved neither too high nor too low. This culture is created comes from the years 7500 b. C, for their graves, built in the centuries its greatest cities, their religious centers and built the great walls. Later in the year 1000 b. C, Kerma civilization came to an end when the water levels were not very high and dried canal system. Three Nile river channels are dry today, gave life to this famous reign on the border with Egypt.

Still, Kerma stunned the world when he survived the catastrophic drought that devastated Egypt 4200 years ago, which created a chaos for almost a century. At the same time the civilizations of the Near East and Mesopotamia were also severely affected by drought. The relationship between climate change and development of ancient river civilizations of the world knew little by inadequate data that hindered the effective integration of the archaeological, fluvial and climatic records, said Professor Jamie Woodward of the University of Manchester. But now, as highlighted by Professor Mark Macklin, University of Aberystwyth, this is the joint work of archaeological data and full environmental paleo compiled to date along the Nile desert

In Nubia four thousand years ago, Kerma people grew because the river floods were large enough to support agriculture, but not so large as to cause damage to coastal  river settlements, Woodward said. In that period they were able to flourish, producing a remarkable craftsmanship, as rivals in Egypt fighting environmental conflicts, social and political, tells the archaeologist.

According to the report of the University, the team used cutting-edge methods for analyzing geological dating dry channels 20 kilometers of its course, and it was the first time that individual flooding of the Nile in the desert were dated. Macklin and Woodward observed hundreds of irrigation deep wells, excavated by modern Sudanese farmers. In some places, the old bed of the Nile canals are still well preserved and emerge on the surface today, have between one and three miles wide with Kerma archaeological sites on its banks.

For Derek Welsby of the British Museum who led the archaeological survey, “Kerma success was also due to its dependence on the practices of animal husbandry that are less susceptible to changes in the level of the flood, are more mobile and more able to cope with environmental stress. ” They were a truly remarkable civilization, producing some of the finest ceramics in the valley of the Nile “.

The Epoch Times is published in 35 countries and in 21 languages.

http://www.lagranepoca.com/27953-revelan-como-sobrevivio-kerma-sequia-que-devasto-egipto-mesopotamia

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