International Mother Earth Day 2017

International Mother Earth Day 2017

International Mother Earth Day is celebrated to remind each of us that the Earth and its ecosystems provide us with life and sustenance.

UN org., 21 April, 2017

It also recognizes a collective responsibility, as called for in the 1992 Rio Declaration, to promote harmony with nature and the Earth to achieve a just balance among the economic, social and environmental needs of present and future generations of humanity.

International Mother Earth Day provides an opportunity to raise public awareness around the world to the challenges regarding the well-being of the planet and all the life it supports.

The theme for 2017 is “Environmental & Climate Literacy”.

Education is the foundation for progress. We need to build a global citizenry fluent in the concepts of climate change and aware of its unprecedented threat to our planet. We need to empower everyone with the knowledge to inspire action in defence of environmental protection.
Environmental and climate literacy is the engine not only for creating green voters and advancing environmental and climate laws and policies but also for accelerating green technologies and jobs.

http://www.un.org/en/events/motherearthday/

10 billion trees disappear annually.

10 billion trees disappear annually.

El Telégrafo newspaper, Ecuador, Wednesday, April 19, 2017.

Globally, about 10 billion trees are lost annually by felling, fire and farming practices at that rate of deforestation, trees will be extinct in 300 years. Bolivia has 5,000 trees per person, in Ecuador there are 468 trees per inhabitant and in Israel 2 trees per inhabitant. The great difference is due to natural factors, climate, topography, soil characteristics, agricultural development, industrial, urban and the impact of human activity,when the world population increases, more is the impact on forests. The greatest extent of forests is in the tropics, with 43% of all trees on the planet, the greatest involvement in forests is manifested in Europe.

Continuar Leyendo 10 billion trees disappear annually.

FAO warns of growing water scarcity amid climate change, population growth

FAO warns of growing water scarcity amid climate change, population growth

Ronnel W. Domingo

Philippine Daily Inquirer / January 24, 2017

Competition for water will intensify as the global population exceeds nine billion people around 2050. The Food and Agriculture Organization is calling for better water management and improved access for small farmers, in a statement warned that growing water scarcity was one of the leading challenges for sustainable development. The FAO chief urged leaders to rise to the food security challenges posed by water scarcity on two fronts: first, promoting ways to both use less water and use it more efficiently, and secondly, by taking steps to secure access to water especially for poor family farmers. Philippines President Duterte promised free irrigation to farmers as part of his campaign promise.

Continuar Leyendo FAO warns of growing water scarcity amid climate change, population growth

The global drought in 2016 and its effects.

Juan G. R., Juan G. R., Juan P. J. A. The global drought in 2016 and its effects.

Water and Irrigation Vol .: 8, No. 1: 3-4, March 2017, Spain.

2016 has been characterized by a year of great climatic instability with a high development of droughts and floods as a result of climate change. The drought has affected many countries worldwide, but the countries of the Horn of Africa and the semi-arid strip of the Sahel, India, China, Bolivia, Mexico, Chile, the countries of the Central Corridor Dry: Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Caribbean countries: Haiti, Dominican Republic, Cuba causing great crop losses, displacement and a major food crisis. There is famine in Ethiopia, Somalia and Kenya that demand humanitarian aid. About 1200 million people live in areas of low rainfall and water scarcity.

Continuar Leyendo The global drought in 2016 and its effects.

In Nicaragua there is no good use of drinking water.

In Nicaragua there is no good use of drinking water.

Josué Garay

The New Journal | 23 January 2017 | Managua Nicaragua.

It is considered that in Nicaragua water is misused due to bad habits. Before 1950 in Nicaragua the people had the habit of harvesting the water, however this changed with the arrival of the system of pipes. Harvesting and reusing water in the urban sector is minimal, but in the countryside the farmers make stabilization ponds to reuse rainwater. According to the specialists the toilet is the one that the greater amount of water spends, followed by the washing machine and gardens irrigation. Currently, the central government is promoting an Adaptation of Agriculture to Climate Change Project through the water harvest. The project has an amount of $ 9.6 million, which is funded by the Swiss Cooperation for the Development.

Continuar Leyendo In Nicaragua there is no good use of drinking water.

Harvests in US to suffer from climate change

Harvests in US to suffer from climate change

Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), January 19, 2017

Some of the most important crops risk substantial damage from rising temperatures. To better assess how climate change caused by human greenhouse gas emissions will likely impact wheat, maize and soybean, an international team of scientists now ran an unprecedentedly comprehensive set of computer simulations of US crop yields. Importantly, the scientists find that increased irrigation can help to reduce the negative effects of global warming on crops, but this is possible only in regions where sufficient water is available.

Continuar Leyendo Harvests in US to suffer from climate change

The Bolivian glaciers are in retreat.

The Bolivian glaciers are in retreat.

Miriam Telma Jemio
By: Univision. Posted: Jan 19, 2017, Bolivia.

The impact of climate change on tropical glaciers, of which 20% is in Bolivia, in the Cordillera Real, are an important source of water for the inhabitants of the communities and cities around El Alto and La Paz. The evidence of this problem is investigated by scientists and comprovated by the inhabitants of the communities around glaciers such as Condoriri, Illimani, Samara and Chacaltaya, when they see the hills becoming increasingly black. The Real mountain range also have important glaciers: Illimani, Mururata, Huayna, Potosí and Illampu. La Paz already experiences rationing due to water scarcity. In this context, these communities must obtain water for drinking, agricultural production and camelid breeding, but there is also the long-term loss of their tourist activity for those who like to climb these snow-capped mountains.

Continuar Leyendo The Bolivian glaciers are in retreat.

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